The Rolling Stones – Aftermath

Aftermath was The Rolling Stones’ fourth album, and the first to consist entirely of Jagger/Richards compositions, one which saw them crossover from mostly R&B imitators to blues-rock innovators in their own right. 1966 was also the year when The Stones could finally rely on their own songwriting talents rather than that of others. Songs such… Read More The Rolling Stones – Aftermath

Radiohead – My Iron Lung

Hot on the heels of the creatively confusing and post adolescent Pablo Honey, Radiohead issued this mini-LP in 1994, ahead of their sophomore release The Bends, one which remains an oft overlooked artefact in the band’s catalogue. What is immediately clear from first song to last, is that Radiohead had done some serious growing up,… Read More Radiohead – My Iron Lung

Jack Kerouac/Steve Allen – Poetry For The Beat Generation

Post-war existentialist hails Charlie Parker and puts Beat Poetry on the map Jack Kerouac is most famous for his iconic novel On the Road, a book which helped define an entire generation of drifters, hitchhikers, poets and musicians (although not exclusively in that order), whom Kerouac collectively coined as “The Beat Generation.” Upon publication in… Read More Jack Kerouac/Steve Allen – Poetry For The Beat Generation

Jack Bruce – Spirit: Live At The BBC 1971-1978

Jack Bruce was one of the finest and most original musicians in popular music. And while he is famous predominately for his work in Sixties supergroup Cream (with Eric Clapton and Ginger Baker), his solo output is no less impressive, which in itself was a genre-defying display of talent that remains startling even today. Spirit:… Read More Jack Bruce – Spirit: Live At The BBC 1971-1978

George Harrison – Living In The Material World

After the glorious, transcendent high of All Things Must Pass, George Harrison’s follow up, 1973’s Living In The Material World was something of a let down. The album was essentially a collection of songs concerned with the reward of enlightenment and the spiritual insolvency that comes with materialism. Harrison himself described the difference in approach… Read More George Harrison – Living In The Material World

Australian Crawl – Crawl File

Surf, sun, pub rock, and something about Bondi (maybe) Back when these songs were recorded, Australia was very different to what it is today. A woman was often referred to as a ‘Sheila,’ men drank beer out of ‘tinnies,’ and political correctness was virtually unheard of. Yes, the cultural cringe of the antipodes was well… Read More Australian Crawl – Crawl File

Van Morrison – Saint Dominic's Preview

At the end of 1971, Van Morrison had released four solo albums, each very different from the one before. From the enigmatic, Baroque folk-jazz of Astral Weeks, the domestic bucolic bliss of Moondance, the communal neo-hippie wanderings of His Band And The Street Choir, to the breezy, country excursions of Tupelo Honey, it seemed that… Read More Van Morrison – Saint Dominic's Preview

Ocean Colour Scene – Moseley Shoals

The early ‘90s saw a major resurgence in England of 1960’s pop-rock values, spearheaded mainly by the likes of Oasis, Paul Weller, Stereophonics, Blur, and a host of other British bands. Part of that movement was Ocean Colour Scene, a group who for some inexplicable reason copped a beating from the English music press at… Read More Ocean Colour Scene – Moseley Shoals

Timothy Leary – You Can Be Anyone This Time Around

Part of the liner notes to this album claim that it is ’The Musical equivalent of a full-blown LSD trip.” Whether that is actually true or not, I can imagine a lot of people back in the day dropping a couple of tabs, before putting it on the turntable. In 1969, LSD guru Timothy Leary was… Read More Timothy Leary – You Can Be Anyone This Time Around